Long Range Plan Community Recommendations Implementation Committee – Public Discussion Page

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5 Responses to Long Range Plan Community Recommendations Implementation Committee – Public Discussion Page

  1. president says:

    For those of you present at the CASCA meeting, please make sure you attend the LRPIC lunch discussion on Thursday, May 30, 12:30pm to 2pm.

  2. Chris Wilson says:

    This is a test message to the LRPIC public discussion page

  3. Frederic Grandmont says:

    Had the chance to speak to CSA president this week at the 33rd space symposium in Colorado.
    A Canadian contribution to WFIRST will not happen unless we lobby the government strongly and quickly (I.e. Before the summer)
    Could be too late if we wait for CASCA.
    On the industry side we pounder if the community is still all in for this project before going any further into our lobbying.

    Will follow up with a personal message to some on this subject…

    Cheers

    Fred

  4. Chris Wilson says:

    This is a test message to the LCRIC public discussion page

  5. Grant Hill says:

    I have just read the document regarding Indigenous consent that was distributed today. The document is explicitly careful not to define a “recipe for consent”. Less explicit, and perhaps implicit, though is that there is some person or organization that one can at least ask. In Canada, for example, there is the Assembly of First Nations which has a National Chief. On a more local level there are tribal chiefs. It bears emphasizing that in Hawaii it is far less clear. The Native Hawaiian community has no single, clearly defined or accepted authoritative body or person that speaks for them. Similarly, in Canada, if I recall correctly, there is some legal definition of who can vote in a tribal election. Things are far less clear in Hawaii. For example, anyone can vote for Office of Hawaiian Affairs Trustees. So even if one might attempt to resort to something like a referendum on a matter, it is manifestly unclear who gets to participate. All of this is a long lead up to a single point. CASCA should be careful not to apply Canadian concepts or presumptions to Native Hawaiian matters at least when it comes to attempting to practically apply noble sentiments. Native Hawaiians that I have spoken with on this point find it offensive and divisive when this sort of thing occurs.
    Aloha,
    Grant

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