Taeduk Radio Astronomy Observatory 2021-2022 Season Call For Proposals

Taeduk Radio Astronomy Observatory 2021-2022 Season Call For Proposals


The next deadline for proposals is 23:59 KST on 2021 August 10.
Proposals should be emailed as a single file in PDF format to:
traoprop@kasi.re.kr


The Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) invites proposals for the Taeduk Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) 14-meter telescope for the 2021 Fall – 2022 Spring season. Proposal candidates should submit up to three pages of scientific and technical justifications (including figures, tables, and references) in addition to their Proposal Cover Sheet in English using the latex templates (form here)

There are two categories of proposals for the 2021-2022 observing season.

  1. General Program (GP): single-year observing program with a telescope time of up to 300 hours
  2. Key Science Program (KSP): multi-year observing program with a telescope time of 400 hours per year, for up to three years

TRAO supports multi-beam spectroscopy observations (4 x 4 array: SEQUOIA-TRAO) at a frequency range of 85 – 115.6 GHz. The TRAO system supports single-sideband observations for position-switched or OTF observations. The backend has two spectral windows controlled independently, each window with 4096 channels in a 62.5 MHz bandwidth. In addition, a single-pixel wide-band (2 GHz) spectrometer is available. Proposal candidates should consult the TRAO Status Report for additional technical specifications: https://radio.kasi.re.kr/trao/status_report2020/

TRAO has a shared-risk remote observing mode available. However, inexperienced users are advised to do the observations on the site. Outside (non-KASI) PIs who intend to use the remote observing mode should specify local collaborators in the proposal. The local collaborators are responsible for handling on-site tasks during the remote observations, such as resetting the system in case of system failure, which happens occasionally.

Minho Choi
TRAO, KASI

Kamloops Statement (June 10, 2021)

The unmarked burial sites at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School represent a colonial atrocity. The 215 children whose remains were found were taken from their families in a systematic effort to eradicate their cultural identities. Thousands of others were forced into dozens of similar institutions and the school in Kamloops is unlikely to be the only site where bodies will be found. It is heinous in the extreme that defenceless and innocent children suffered emotional and physical violence, and the trauma of these events continues to be felt today.

Canada’s astronomical community joins with Canadians from all walks of life to stand in solidarity with the Tk’emlúps te Secwepemc First Nations, as well as with other communities and families who have lost their children at the hands of the Canadian government and religious institutions. Their pain and grief cannot be imagined by us, and we recognize that the recent confirmation of the Kamloops unmarked graves may be particularly distressing for Indigenous members of our Society.

As academics and educators, we must confront the fact that residential school atrocities were committed in the name of education and acknowledge the role that academia has played in perpetuating colonial structures.

CASCA’s recently published Long Range Plan lays out specific actions that we as astronomers will take to address racism and inequity in our community, particularly the marginalization of Indigenous Peoples. As we take these first steps toward fulfilling the LRP vision for a more inclusive community, the news from Kamloops is a stark reminder of the ongoing trauma that underpins the inequities we are striving to address.

The CASCA Board

CASCA member is co-winner of prestigious IAU Shaw Prize.

Victoria Kaspi PhD, CC, FRS, FRSC of McGill University is the co-winner of the 2021 Shaw Prize in Astronomy. This year’s prize was awarded for the work which she and Chryssa Kouveliotou have done in the field of magnetars: a class of highly magnetised neutron star. Here is the link to the IAU press release detailing their research.

The Shaw Prize, established under the auspices of Mr Run Run Shaw in November 2002, is an international award to honour individuals who are currently active in their respective fields and have recently achieved distinguished and significant advances making outstanding contributions in academic and scientific research or applications. The Shaw Prize consists of three annual awards: the Prize in Astronomy, the Prize in Life Science and Medicine, and the Prize in Mathematical Sciences. Each prize carries a monetary award of one million two hundred thousand US dollars.