Henri Lamarre

Meet Henri Lamarre from l’Université de Montréal!

le français suit

Solar flares are events triggered by magnetic reconnection in the magnetic field, which encompasses the solar corona and extends into its photosphere. The Earth’s magnetic field stops the majority of particles emitted by solar flares which reach the Earth. Thus, these eruptions do generally not directly affect humans. However, in the case of significant solar eruptions, the ejected particles can penetrate the terrestrial magnetic field and affect humans and our terrestrial infrastructure. In effect, these events pose a severe danger to the safety of our astronauts, cause lasting damage to our electrical grid on Earth, and scramble satellite communications. 

Therefore, correctly predicting significant solar eruptions remains an active research field for several decades. However, the current models are not yet trustworthy. Most models do not predict the flares better than the static mean of the frequency of the flares. The solar flares have much in common with avalanches since they are both characterized by the accumulation of energy over a considerable period followed by a rapid outburst of this energy covering a vast range of characteristic scales. Moreover, other systems, such as seismic events or forest fires, share similar characteristics. Thus, network models have shown great promise in modeling types of phenomena and predicting their occurrence. The network models calculate the twisting of the magnetic field in the coronal loops to produce magnetic reconnections, thus modeling solar flares.

My project is to predict solar flare events using data assimilation techniques coupled with avalanche models. This methodology was established by Strugarek et al. 2014 and has undergone several tests (Thibeault et al. 2022). The idea, thus, is to build upon this existing protocol  an operation system of prediction for intense solar flares.

Les éruptions solaires sont des évènements déclenchés par la reconnexion magnétique dans le champ magnétique s’étendant dans la couronne solaire à partir de sa photosphère. La grande majorité des particules émises par éruptions solaires qui atteignent la terre sont stoppés par son champ magnétique. Ainsi, ces éruptions n’affectent pas directement les humains. Cependant, dans le cas d’éruptions solaires majeures, les particules éjectées peuvent pénétrer le champ magnétique terrestre et affecter les humains et les infrastructures terrestres. En effet, ces évènements peuvent poser un réel danger pour la santé des astronautes, causer des dommages aux réseaux de distribution électrique sur la terre, ainsi que brouiller la communication satellite.
Ainsi, prédire correctement les éruptions majeures demeure un champ de recherche très actif depuis plusieurs décennies. Cependant, les modèles actuels ne sont pas encore très performants. La plupart des modèles actuels ne peuvent prédire beaucoup mieux qu’au-delà des statistiques moyennes de la fréquence des éruptions du Soleil. Les éruptions solaires ont beaucoup en commun avec les avalanches car ces phénomènes sont caractérisés par l’accumulation d’énergie sur une grande période temporelle, suivie d’une libération d’énergie rapide et couvrant une vaste gamme d’échelles caractéristiques. Par ailleurs, d’autres systèmes partagent ces caractéristiques, comme par exemple les séismes et les feux de forêts. Ainsi, les modèles sur réseau se sont montrés prometteurs dans la modélisation de ce type de phénomènes, ainsi que dans leur prédiction. Ces modèles sur réseau modélisent la torsion du champ magnétique dans les boucles coronales ainsi que les reconnexions magnétiques qui s’y produisent.
Ainsi, mon projet est de prédire les éruptions solaires en utilisant des techniques d’assimilations de données couplées aux modèles avalanches. Ce protocole de prédiction a déjà été établi (Strugarek, et al. 2014) et a déjà fait ses preuves. (Thibeault, et al. 2022) L’idée est ici de bâtir sur ce protocole existant un système de prédiction opérationel des fortes éruptions solaires

Les éruptions solaires sont des évènements déclenchés par la reconnexion magnétique dans le champ magnétique s’étendant dans la couronne solaire à partir de sa photosphère. La grande majorité des particules émises par éruptions solaires qui atteignent la terre sont stoppés par son champ magnétique. Ainsi, ces éruptions n’affectent pas directement les humains. Cependant, dans le cas d’éruptions solaires majeures, les particules éjectées peuvent pénétrer le champ magnétique terrestre et affecter les humains et les infrastructures terrestres. En effet, ces évènements peuvent poser un réel danger pour la santé des astronautes, causer des dommages aux réseaux de distribution électrique sur la terre, ainsi que brouiller la communication satellite.   

Ainsi, prédire correctement les éruptions majeures demeure un champ de recherche très actif depuis plusieurs décennies. Cependant, les modèles actuels ne sont pas encore très performants. La plupart des modèles actuels ne peuvent prédire beaucoup mieux qu’au-delà des statistiques moyennes de la fréquence des éruptions du Soleil. Les éruptions solaires ont beaucoup en commun avec les avalanches car ces phénomènes sont caractérisés par l’accumulation d’énergie sur une grande période temporelle, suivie d’une libération d’énergie rapide et couvrant une vaste gamme d’échelles caractéristiques. Par ailleurs, d’autres systèmes partagent ces caractéristiques, comme par exemple les séismes et les feux de forêts. Ainsi, les modèles sur réseau se sont montrés prometteurs dans la modélisation de ce type de phénomènes, ainsi que dans leur prédiction. Ces modèles sur réseau modélisent la torsion du champ magnétique dans les boucles coronales ainsi que les reconnexions magnétiques qui s’y produisent. 

Ainsi, mon projet est de prédire les éruptions solaires en utilisant des techniques d’assimilations de données couplées aux modèles avalanches. Ce protocole de prédiction a déjà été établi (Strugarek, et al. 2014) et a déjà fait ses preuves. (Thibeault, et al. 2022) L’idée est ici de bâtir sur ce protocole existant un système de prédiction opérationel des fortes éruptions solaires

 

 

Co-direction: Paul Charbonneau (Université de Montréal) et Antoine Strugarek (CEA Paris-Saclay)                                                

Pamela Freeman; November 2022

Meet Pamela Freeman, October’s GradHighlightee! 

le français suit

How do complex, potentially pre-biotic, molecules form during the star formation process? Pamela studies this through astrochemistry—specifically, the molecular makeup and evolution of Galactic gas and dust clouds. Using radio telescopes in the millimeter and sub-millimeter range, the molecular spectral line emission of carbon-based complex and carbon-chain bearing molecules is detected and studied. These molecules, and their formation, are highly sensitive to environmental conditions, thus the presence, spatial distribution, intensity of the observations reveals the physical conditions and evolutionary history of the region.

 

Pamela’s PhD research, under the supervision of Dr. René Plume at the University of Calgary, focuses on the question: if there are abundant carbon chain molecules in high mass star forming regions, where are they and how did they get there? With recent surveys from the GBT 100m dish and the IRAM 30m Telescope, Pamela has mapped and modeled spectral lines of methanol, CH3OH, and propyne, CH3CCH, as examples of complex organic and carbon-chain molecules. The temperature and column density (number of molecules along the line of sight) are discerned from the relative and absolute intensity of the spectral lines. Each transition line traces different environmental conditions; having numerous lines gives greater confidence in the resulting parameters.

 

Methanol and propyne are found to have different temperature and velocity structure through our local thermodynamic equilibrium model, meaning they are emitting from different physical environments or gas. Propyne, at the modeled temperatures of 20-30 K, could be retained from cold gas-phase formation early in the star forming cycle, or, could be regenerated in these ‘warm’ environments near a protostar. Comparing the observed molecular densities to chemical evolution models will further discern the formation route. Since high mass star forming regions are responsible for most of the star formation in the Galaxy, these results will help us understand how these important chemical processes proceed as a link between the interstellar medium and planetary bodies.

 

Aside from star formation, Pamela can be found working on CASCA GSC vice-chair duties, her science communication skills, and learning ways to make academic science accessible. She also loves to spend time outdoors, away from her computer.

 

The velocity (top row), column density (bottom left, contours are in levels of 1e13, 4e13, 7e13, 1e14, 4e14 cm-2), and excitation temperature (bottom right, contours in levels of 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 K) of methanol, CH3OH, and propyne, CH3CCH, around the high mass star forming region IRAS 20126+4104, marked with the white ‘x’. The velocity of IRAS 20126+4104 is -3.5 km/s. Methanol aligns with a small scale outflow oriented SE-NW (Cesaroni et al. 1997,1999), while propyne aligns with a large scale outflow oriented S-N (Wilking et al. 1990, Shepherd et al. 2000). Methanol is concentrated around the known hot core, with a steeper gradient of temperature reaching a maximum of 42 K just offset from the source. Propyne has a relatively extended distribution, with a more uniform temperature of 20-30 K. We do not see the hot core temperatures of > 100 K, as we are likely smoothing it out with the resolution of single dish telescopes.                                     La vitesse (ligne du haut), la densité de colonne (en bas à gauche, les contours sont dans les niveaux de 1e13, 4e13, 7e13, 1e14, 4e14 cm-2), et la température d’excitation (en bas à droite, les contours sont dans les niveaux de 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 K) du méthanol, CH3OH, et du propyne, CH3CCH, autour de la région de formation d’étoiles de masse élevée IRAS 20126+4104, marquée par le ‘x’ blanc. La vitesse d’IRAS 20126+4104 est de -3,5 km/s. Le méthanol s’aligne avec un écoulement à petite échelle orienté SE-NW (Cesaroni et al. 1997,1999), tandis que la propyne s’aligne avec un écoulement à grande échelle orienté S-N (Wilking et al. 1990, Shepherd et al. 2000). Le méthanol est concentré autour du noyau chaud connu, avec un gradient de température plus raide atteignant un maximum de 42 K juste à l’écart de la source. Le propyne a une distribution relativement étendue, avec une température plus uniforme de 20-30 K. Nous ne voyons pas les températures du noyau chaud de > 100 K, car nous les lissons probablement avec la résolution des télescopes à une seule antenne.

 

 

 

Voici Pamela Freeman, la lauréate du mois d’octobre ! 

 

Comment des molécules complexes, potentiellement pré-biotiques, se forment-elles au cours du processus de formation des étoiles ? Pamela étudie cette question par le biais de l’astrochimie, et plus précisément de la composition moléculaire et de l’évolution des nuages de gaz et de poussière galactiques. À l’aide de radiotélescopes dans le domaine millimétrique et submillimétrique, elle détecte et étudie l’émission des lignes spectrales moléculaires des molécules complexes à base de carbone et des molécules à chaîne carbonée. Ces molécules, et leur formation, sont très sensibles aux conditions environnementales. Ainsi, la présence, la distribution spatiale et l’intensité des observations révèlent les conditions physiques et l’histoire de l’évolution de la région.

 

La recherche doctorale de Pamela, sous la supervision du Dr René Plume à l’Université de Calgary, se concentre sur la question suivante : s’il y a des molécules de chaîne de carbone en abondance dans les régions de formation d’étoiles de masse élevée, où sont-elles et comment sont-elles arrivées là ? Grâce aux récents relevés de la parabole de 100 m du GBT et du télescope de 30 m de l’IRAM, Pamela a cartographié et modélisé les lignes spectrales du méthanol, CH3OH, et de la propyne, CH3CCH, qui sont des exemples de molécules organiques complexes et à chaîne de carbone. La température et la densité de la colonne (nombre de molécules le long de la ligne de visée) sont discernées à partir de l’intensité relative et absolue des lignes spectrales. Chaque ligne de transition retrace différentes conditions environnementales ; le fait d’avoir de nombreuses lignes donne une plus grande confiance dans les paramètres résultants.

 

Notre modèle d’équilibre thermodynamique local révèle que le méthanol et le propyne ont une structure de température et de vitesse différente, ce qui signifie qu’ils sont émis par des environnements physiques ou des gaz différents. Le propyne, aux températures modélisées de 20-30 K, pourrait être retenu de la formation de la phase gazeuse froide au début du cycle de formation des étoiles, ou pourrait être régénéré dans ces environnements ” chauds ” près d’une proto-étoile. La comparaison des densités moléculaires observées avec les modèles d’évolution chimique permettra de mieux discerner la voie de formation. Comme les régions de formation d’étoiles de haute masse sont responsables de la plupart de la formation d’étoiles dans la Galaxie, ces résultats nous aideront à comprendre comment ces processus chimiques importants se déroulent en tant que lien entre le milieu interstellaire et les corps planétaires.

 

En dehors de la formation d’étoiles, on peut trouver Pamela en train de travailler sur les fonctions de vice-présidente du CSS de la CASCA, sur ses compétences en communication scientifique et sur les moyens de rendre la science universitaire accessible. Elle aime également passer du temps à l’extérieur, loin de son ordinateur.

 

Adam Dong

Meet Adam Dong from UBC!

I am a graduate student at UBC and a member of the CHIME/FRB and CHIME/Pulsar collaborations. Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are bright millisecond bursts in radio frequencies. There have been many theories over their origin, ranging from kilonovae to extraterrestrial activity; however, they remain a mystery. Recently CHIME/FRB has found that at least some of the population of FRBs can likely be explained by magnetars. I am also interested in pulsar science. Pulsars are dense objects which are the remnants of massive stars. They behave like lighthouses in radio frequencies and we detect them as pulsed emissions on Earth. I use CHIME/FRB as a giant net to find new pulsars candidates and CHIME/Pulsar as a sieve to filter out the noise from astrophysical signals.

Pulsars are used for many things, from low-frequency gravitational wave detections to testing fundamental physics. While we can utilize pulsars at great lengths, there have always been foundational questions, like their emission mechanism, left wanting. Several exciting varieties of pulsars that can help study their intrinsic properties are nulling pulsars, intermittent pulsars, and Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs). The place that each type of object holds amongst neutron stars is still a hotly debated subject, and they are often conflated. I am attempting to use CHIME/FRB to approach this problem.

Copyright 2016 Richard Shaw, drone photo of the CHIME telescope located at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory a national facility for astronomy.

 

Je suis un étudiant au troisième cycle à l’Université de Colombie Brittanque. En plus, je suis un membre de deux collaborations: CHIME/FRB et CHIME/Pulsar. Les sursauts rapids en radio (FRBs en anglais) sont les sursauts brillants qui durent plusieurs milliseconds en radio. Il y a plusieurs théories qui décrivent leur origine; des théories constatent qu’ils proviennent des kilonovae et les autres constatent qu’ils proviennent de l’acitivité extraterrestre. Cependant, leur vraie origine demeure inconnue. Récemment, le collaboration de CHIME/FRB a trouvé qu’il existe une population de ces FRBS qui proviennent de magnetars. Magnetars sont les remnantes d’une étoile massive qui sont extrêmement denses qui ont des champs magnétique forts. J’utilise CHIME pour découvrir nouveux FRBs.

 

CaTS

We are pleased to announce that your CASCA Graduate Student Committee is launching a new seminar series entitled CaTS — Canadian Telescope Seminars. The goal of these quarterly seminars is to highlight the opportunities provided to Canadian graduate students by the many and diverse astronomical observatories located in Canada or heavily involved in Canadian astronomy. During each session, an observatory will present its telescopes, instruments, and personnel. 

Since the goal is to bolster graduate student involvement at these institutions, the observatories will focus on how graduate students can implicate themselves in the observatory through research projects and/or observation time proposals. Unless otherwise noted, the sessions take place at 3 PM EST.

 

Zoom info: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/2842565936?pwd=d2ppSlVwTklVUG9lclI1Wm1pVHJBQT09

 

Date (M/D/Y) Observatory Youtube Link PDF Link
03/10/2021 Canada-France-Hawai’i Telescope (CFHT) https://youtu.be/tEO-rXy5pEI CFHT.pdf
04/28/2021 James Clark Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) https://youtu.be/h5gbP–iiCQ JCMT.pdf
05/19/2021 Square Kilometer Array (SKA) https://youtu.be/IAflQe4tM2A SKA.pdf
06/16/2021 Canadian Space Telescope (CASTOR) N/A ————
07/14/2021 Gemini Observatory N/A due to technical difficulties Gemini.pdf
10/27/2021 James Web Space Telescope (JWST) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUGu6VLE0zU JWST.pdf
11/17/2021 Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) https://youtu.be/4oEjeehb-Vc CHIME-FRB.pdf & CHIME-Pulars.pdf

GradHighlights

Meet our GradHighlightees!

Every month we highlight one outstanding graduate student and their research. Click on the tabs below for more information!