Postdoctoral Position in Galaxy Evolution at UBC

Applications are invited for a postdoctoral position in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of British Columbia under the supervision of Prof. Allison Man.

The successful candidate will develop software to analyze JWST observations and facilitate the planning and analysis of integral field unit observations. In collaboration with the UBC Extragalactic Astrophysics Group, they will perform research on a broad range of topics in galaxy evolution, including and not limited to star formation and AGN in nearby and distant galaxies, circumgalactic medium, and the influence of large-scale environment on galaxy evolution. They will have the opportunity to perform research using observations awarded to the group obtained using JWST, ALMA, and Gemini. They have the opportunity to join the Euclid Consortium, and to apply for Canadian observing time on JWST, ALMA, Gemini, and CFHT. In addition, they have access to high-performance computers, and funding for travels and publications. The successful candidate will spend 70% of their time on software development, and 30% of their time on related science work.

The position will be available as soon as is mutually agreeable. The appointment will initially be for two years, and extension is possible depending on performance and funding. Applicants must have obtained a PhD in Astronomy or Physics not more than 5 years prior to the start date. Experience in Python programming, Git, and astronomical observations is essential. The salary will be in the range $65,000-70,000 CAD, depending on experience. UBC offers postdocs a comprehensive benefits plan that includes extended health and dental coverage.

Applicants should upload a CV, a cover letter and a research statement in PDF format by February 16, 2024 to https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/26996/apply . Applicants should also arrange for three letters of reference to be sent.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.

LRP2020 white papers and reports

This page links the individual white papers and reports submitted as input to LRP2020.

White papers submitted by the community

Authors Title Category
J. Hutchings Space Astronomy new facilities, experiments and missions
A. Boley et al. The Role of NewSpace in Furthering Canadian Astronomy other
J. Gagné et al. The opportunity of young nearby associations with the advent of the Gaia mission science programs, science topics and science themes
K. Venn et al. Machine Learning Advantages in Canadian Astrophysics data analysis, data management and data storage
N. van der Marel et al. Signposts of planet formation in protoplanetary disks science programs, science topics and science themes
M. Balogh et al. Science, Technical and Strategic benefits of Canadian partnership with Subaru new facilities, experiments and missions
H. Neilson et al. Indigenizing the next decade of astronomy in Canada equity, diversity, and inclusion
H. Neilson et al. Canadian Astronomy on Maunakea: On Respecting Indigenous Rights equity, diversity, and inclusion
A. Liu et al. Low-redshift 21cm Cosmology in Canada science programs, science topics and science themes
G. Eadie et al. Astrostatistics in Canada
science programs, science topics and science themes
data analysis, data management and data storage
state of the profession
training, careers, demographics and professional development
other
E. Griffin et al. Back to the Future: Supporting New Science with our Legacy Data data analysis, data management and data storage
A. Liu et al. High-redshift 21cm Cosmology in Canada science programs, science topics and science themes
A. Boley et al. Small and Moderate Aperture Telescope for Research and Education other
D. Crabtree Canada’s astronomy performance based on bibliometrics state of the profession
W.C. Fraser et al. Canadian Participation in the LSST science programs, science topics and science themes
I. Stairs et al. Pulsar Timing Arrays: Gravitational Waves from Supermassive Black Holes and More science programs, science topics and science themes
E. Rosolowsky et al. Star Formation in the Galactic Ecosystem science programs, science topics and science themes
P. Côté et al. CASTOR: A Flagship Canadian Space Telescope new facilities, experiments and missions
C. Wilson et al. Development Plans for the Atacama Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) proposed upgrades to current facilities
W. Percival et al. The Euclid Mission new facilities, experiments and missions
C. D. Matzner et al. Astronomy in a Low-Carbon Future state of the profession
S. Côté et al. GEMINI in the coming decade instrument design and development
E. Fonseca et al. Fundamental Physics with Pulsars science programs, science topics and science themes
V. Hénault-Brunet et al. Star Clusters Near and Far science programs, science topics and science themes
A. McConnachie et al. The next decade of optical wide field astronomy in Canada science programs, science topics and science themes
M. Rahman et al. Probing Diverse Phenomena through Data-Intensive Astronomy science programs, science topics and science themes
J. Bolduc-Duval et al. Astronomy and UNESCO’s Sustainable Development Goals outreach, education and teaching
K. Vanderlinde et al. The Canadian Hydrogen and Observatory and Radio transient Detector (CHORD) new facilities, experiments and missions
S. Sadavoy et al. The Life Cycle of Dust science programs, science topics and science themes
P. Hall et al. The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer proposed upgrades to current facilities
K. Hoffman et al. The Colibri Mission: Canada’s Flag-ship X-ray Telescope new facilities, experiments and missions
J. Di Francesco et al. The Next Generation Very Large Array new facilities, experiments and missions
P. Langill et al. LRP2020: CASCA’s EPO Committee White Paper: Proposed National EPO Projects for CASCA outreach, education and teaching
T. E. Woods et al. Revealing the Origin and Cosmic Evolution of Supermassive Black Holes science programs, science topics and science themes
D. Johnstone et al. Mid-Through Far-Infrared Astronomy: The Path to Tomorrow science programs, science topics and science themes
I. Caiazzo et al. Unveiling the secrets of black holes and neutron stars with high-throughput, high-energy resolution X-ray spectroscopy science programs, science topics and science themes
T. Landecker et al. DRAO Synthesis Telescope proposed upgrades to current facilities
P. C. Breysse et al. Astrophysics and Cosmology with Line Intensity Mapping science programs, science topics and science themes
D. R. Andersen et al. The Canadian Roots of the TMT First Light Instruments NFIRAOS and IRIS instrument and design development
J. E. Taylor et al. Theoretical Astrophysics in Canada other
R. Fernandez et al. The cosmic origin and evolution of the elements science programs, science topics and science themes
J. J. Ruan et al. A Vision for Canadian Leadership in Multi-Messenger Astrophysics in the Next Decade science programs, science topics and science themes
L. Fissel et al. Balloon astrophysics in Canada over the next decade
new facilities, experiments and missions
proposed upgrades to current facilities, experiments and missions
instrument design and development
training, careers, demographics and professional development
A. S. Hill et al. Canadian Investigations of the Interstellar Medium science programs, science topics and science themes
N. Ouellette et al. Astronomy Advocacy and Engagement
outreach, education and teaching
training, careers, demographics and professional development
equity, diversity and inclusion
K. Spekkens et al. Canada and the SKA from 2020 – 2030 new facilities, experiment and missions
C. Lovekin et al. Astronomy Research at Canadian Comprehensive Research Universities state of the profession
S. Chapman et al. Science with ground based, single dish Submillimeter Wave Telescopes new facilities, experiments and missions
D. Naylor et al. SPICA: the next observatory class infrared space astronomy mission new facilities, experiments and missions
R. Hložek et al. CMB Science in Canada new facilities, experiments and missions
R. Hložek et al. Science with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope new facilities, experiments and missions
S. Lawler et al. Planetary Astronomy-Understanding the Origin of the Solar System science programs, science topics and science themes
D. Scott et al. Cosmology in front of the background: studying the growth of structure at CMB wavelengths science programs, science topics and science themes
S. Metchev et al. Continuing Canadian Leadership in Small-satellite Astronomy new facilities, experiments and missions
J. West et al. Cosmic Magnetism science programs, science topics and science themes
J. Cami et al. Molecular Astrophysics and Astrochemistry science programs, science topics and science themes laboratory astrophysics
R. Doyon et al. Entering a new Era of Astrophysics with the James Webb Space Telescope new facilities, experiments and missions
V. Kaspi et al. LRP2020 White Paper on Radio Transients science programs, science topics and science themes
C. Marois et al. Exoplanet Imaging: a technological and scientific road-map for finding Life signatures on other Worlds science programs, science topics and science themes
A. Man et al. Characterizing Galaxies in the Early Universe science programs, science topics and science themes
K. Spekkens et al. Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in the Canadian Astronomical Society in the Next Decade equity, diversity and inclusion
JJ Kavelaars et al. Digital Research Infrastructure in Astronomy new facilities, experiments and missions
J. Di Francesco et al. The Formation of Stars – From Filaments to Cores to Protostars and Protoplanetry Disks science programs, science topics and science themes
H. Ngo et al. Opportunities and Outcomes for Postdocs in Canada state of the profession training, careers, demographics and professional development equity, diversity and inclusion
B. Benneke et al. Exoplanet instrumentation in the 2020s: Canada’s pathway towards searching for life on potentially Earth-like exoplanets
new facilities, experiments and missions
B. Matthews et al. Debris disks as probes of exoplanetary systems science programs, science topics and science themes
K. Venn et al. Industrial Initiatives in Canadian Astronomy other

Reports solicited by the LRP2020 panel

Please don’t be a DOOFAAS!

By/par Pauline Barmby
(Cassiopeia – Winter/hivers 2016)

If you haven’t seen the Dumb Or Overly Forced Astronomical Acronyms Site (or DOOFAAS) produced by Canadian astronomer Glen Petitpas, go have a look. It’s pretty hilarious. It doesn’t yet list “H0 Lenses in COSMOGRAIL’s Wellspring” (H0LiCOW), which, I have to say, still makes me scratch my head.

In astronomy we like to make up names for our projects, be they instruments, telescopes, surveys, or programs. Often these are clever or silly; usually they are more memorable than the standard space agency three-letter acronym. It’s a way to make a project more fun and to perhaps get it a little more attention when colleagues first hear about it.

It’s possible to go too far with being clever, however. One person’s slightly risqué or edgy name can make others uncomfortable and send the signal that our field is unwelcoming. A well-known example is Source Extractor, a heavily-used astronomy software package that has littered hard drives with “.sex” files for decades[1]. There are other, more recent examples that I won’t dignify by mentioning.

The CASCA meeting Code of Conduct specifically notes that “All communication should be appropriate for a professional audience including people of many different backgrounds. Sexual language and imagery is not appropriate.” Other conferences have similar codes. So if you give your project a racy name, the organizers could (and should!) ask you not to mention it by name. This is probably not what you want.

The next time you make up a project acronym, think about the consequences. What messages does it send? Could you talk to a group of 12-year-olds about it without them giggling? How about your university president? When the committee assessing your next job application finds the project name in a Tweet or a Facebook post, what will they think about your character? There are plenty of ways to be creative without being exclusionary, so that people smile rather than grimace when they hear about your project. Please don’t be a DOOFAAS.

[1] Did you know that the configuration files for this program can have any extension? I call mine .cfg.

e-Cassiopeia Template

fall
 

&#9808 Autumnal Equinox &#9809

Published September 23, 2014

 
 

Andromeda, as shown in an engraving from the 17th century Firmamentum Sobiescianum sive Uranographia star atlas by Johannes Hevelius. Credit: U.S. Naval Observatory and the Space Telescope Science Institute.

Andromeda, as shown in an engraving from the 17th century Firmamentum Sobiescianum sive Uranographia star atlas by Johannes Hevelius. Credit: U.S. Naval Observatory and the Space Telescope Science Institute.

In this issue:

ACURA News
An ALMA Update
NRC Herzberg News
Bulletin de CNRC Herzberg
Updates from the Canadian Gemini Office
Nouvelles de l’Office Gemini Canadien
Arctic Update
Continuing Evolution of JCMT
Mid-Term Review of LRP


Editors: Joanne Rosvick & Magdalen Normandeau
 
E-cass is CASCA’s quarterly Newsletter, published on or near the solstices and equinoxes (March 21, June 21, September 21 and December 21). To submit a contribution please email cassiopeia.editors@gmail.com. All submissions must be received at least one week in advance to be published in the next edition. We accept plain text and Word documents. Please include any images as attachments in your email, not embedded in the text.