Gemini News/Nouvelles de Gemini

By/par Stéphanie Côté
(Cassiopeia – Autumn/Automne 2015)

La version française suit

New Batch of Accepted Large and Long Programs in 2015

The results of the Large and Long Programs 2015 selection are out, and there are 5 new Programs that were accepted this year. All of them have US PIs, with a total of 8 Canadian Co-Is who are participating in three of the projects. Zachary Draper (PhD student at University of Victoria), Samantha Lawler (University of Victoria), Brenda Matthews (NRC Herzberg), Sebastian Bruzzone (PhD student at University of Western Ontario), Stan Metchev (University of Western Ontario), and Max Millar-Blanchaer (PhD student at University of Toronto) will be working on “Characterizing Dusty Debris in Exoplanetary Systems” led by Christine Chen (STScI). Chris Willott (NRC Herzberg) will be working with Yue Shen (Carnegie) on “A GNIRS Near-IR Spectroscopic Survey of z>5.7 Quasars”, and Craig Heinke (University of Alberta) will be working with Robert Hynes (Louisiana State University) on “Dynamical Masses of Black Holes and Neutron Stars from the Galactic Bulge Survey” using GMOS-S.

The two other accepted Large Programs for 2015 are led by Ian Crossfield (U of Arizona) “Validating K2’s Habitable and Rocky Planets with AO Imaging” and Catherine Huitson (University of Colorado) “The First Survey Dedicated to the Detection and Characterization of Clouds in Exoplanet Atmospheres”.

First GRACES Science Data Publically Available

A small set of science targets were observed with GRACES during its commissioning ahead of the 2015B semester. The targets were selected by the STAC and include a QSO, nuclei of nearby galaxies, a planetary nebula, some alpha-element rich stars, and a solar twin star, as well as spectrophotometric standards. The data both raw and reduced (via the Opera pipeline) are available publically here. The data are superb and GRACES throughput is even better than anticipated. Figure 1 shows a comparison with the performance of other high-resolution spectrographs on 8-10 meters telescopes and GRACES clearly outperforms them in the red starting at about 600 nm. GRACES was developed at NRC Herzberg in collaboration with FiberTech Optica (from Kitchener, ON), and the help of Gemini and CFHT staff. Another great success story for Canadian innovative technology!

Figure 1 - This shows the measured S/N obtained after a 1 hour observation of the star Feige 66 with GRACES (2 fiber mode, in black), compared to HIRES/Keck (in green) and UVES/VLT (in blue). In the red starting at about 600nm GRACES clearly outperforms them.

Figure 1 – This shows the measured S/N obtained after a 1 hour observation of the star Feige 66 with GRACES (2 fiber mode, in black), compared to HIRES/Keck (in green) and UVES/VLT (in blue). In the red starting at about 600nm GRACES clearly outperforms them.

Fast Turnaround Proposals: deadline every end of the month

This is a reminder that the Fast Turnaround Program is continuing on Gemini-North all through the year, and that there is a deadline for proposals at the end of every month. Accepted programs will be active a month later and for a total of 3 months. Already many Canadian programs have been accepted and observed. The next deadline is on September 30th (even though there is also a regular Call for Proposals for PI time). Note that GRACES is offered for this September FT call, as well as all other facility instruments in the North.

Users might be under the impression that the FT program should be used exclusively for observations that need to be carried out promptly. This is not at all the case. FT proposals can be aimed at following up unusual or unexpected astronomical events but also for pilot studies, or short self-contained projects, or speculative and risky short observations, or for the completion of a thesis when only a few short extra observations are needed or for the completion of an existing dataset to allow publication, or any other kind of short project.

The latest news is that the Board has just approved for FT proposals to be accepted for Gemini-South as well. The first call for proposals including Gemini South will probably be for the end of October deadline. The plan is that proposals for both telescopes will go into a single pool with time allocated according to merit rather than enforcing a strict 50:50 North:South division.

Please sign up to the Fast Turnaround mailing list by sending a message to gemini-FT-reminders+subscribe@gemini.edu (similarly, you can unsubscribe using gemini-FT-reminders+unsubscribe@gemini.edu). The mailing list will be used to send monthly deadline reminders and news about changes to the program that may affect or interest users.

Lots of Good Stuff in the Gemini Data Reductions User Forum

This Forum is a place for trading ideas, scripts and best practices, and taking part in discussions with other users of data reduction processes and strategies. If you have a general question about strategies or approaches to reduction of particular types of data, try the Forum to find help. And if you have written a script, procedure, or have tips for other users you are very welcome to share them on the Forum. Since its creation last year it is now getting populated with a lot of interesting information, for example you can find a GMOS IFU reduction cookbook and reduction scripts, a GMOS longslit reduction scripts including a Nod&Shuffle tutorial, a new NIFS Python data reduction pipeline, as well as scripts for GNIRS and Flamingos2 reductions. Check it out at DR Forum.

Note also that there is a short new tutorial on “Installing Ureka and PyRAF 101” written by Kathleen Labrie available here.

Recent Canadian Press Releases

  • The discovery of a young Jupiter-like exoplanet named 51 Eri b was announced by the GPI Campaign team. This is the first exoplanet discovered as part of the GPI Exoplanet Survey (GPIES), a survey of over 600 nearby stars to be carried out over the next three years. This new planet is about twice the mass of Jupiter and orbits a young star just 20 million years old. In addition to being what is likely the lowest-mass planet ever imaged, it is also the first one for which large amounts of methane have been directly detected in the atmosphere. This makes it very similar to the gas giant planets in our own Solar System, which have heavy methane dominated atmospheres. Thus 51 Eridani b gives us a glimpse of how Jupiter was when our solar system was young. GPIES is led by B.MacIntosh (Standford) and includes many Canadians: C.Marois, B.Matthews, L.Saddlemeyer (NRC Herzberg), Z.Draper, B.Gerard, M.Johnson-Groh (U of Victoria), J.Rameau, E.Artigau, R.Doyon, D.Lafreniere (U de Montréal), S.Bruzzone, S.Metchev (U of Western Ontario), J.Chilcote, J.Maire (Dunlap Institute), and M.Millar-Blanchaer (U of Toronto). You can view the full press release here.
    Figure 2 - GPI image of 51 Eri b. The bright central star has been mostly removed by a hardware and software mask to enable the detection of the exoplanet one million times fainter. Credits: J. Rameau (UdeM) and C. Marois (NRC Herzberg)

    Figure 2 – GPI image of 51 Eri b. The bright central star has been mostly removed by a hardware and software mask to enable the detection of the exoplanet one million times fainter. Credits: J. Rameau (UdeM) and C. Marois (NRC Herzberg)

  • A joint press release between University of Toronto and Gemini was released on September 16th 2015, presenting an updated orbit for beta Pic b based on new astrometric measurements taken in GPI’s spectroscopic mode spanning 14 months. The series of images captured between November 2013 to April 2015 shows the exoplanet β Pic b as it moves through 1 ½ years of its 22-year orbital period. Not only these are the most accurate measurements of the planet’s position ever made, but the data also enable to study the dynamical interactions of the exoplanet β Pic b and the surrounding debris disk. The orbital fit also constrains the stellar mass of Beta Pic, to 1.60\pm0.05 solar masses. The study was led by M.Millar-Blanchaer (U of Toronto), with the help of D-S.Moon (U of Toronto), J.Chilcote, J.Maire (Dunlap Institute), Z.Draper (U of Victoria), J.Dunn, C.Marois, L.Saddlemeyer (NRC Herzberg). To see the full press release and animation click here.


Nouveaux Programmes Longs et Larges accceptés pour 2015

Les résultats de la sélection des Longs et Larges programmes de 2015 sont sortis, et il y a 5 nouveaux programmes qui ont été acceptés cette année. Ils ont tous un PI américain, avec un total de 8 Canadian qui collaborent à trois des projets. Zachary Draper (étudiant PhD à l’Université de Victoria), Samantha Lawler (Université de Victoria), Brenda Matthews (NRC Herzberg), Sebastian Bruzzone (étudiant PhD à l’Université de Western Ontario), Stan Metchev (Université Western Ontario), et Max Millar-Blanchaer (étudiant PhD à l’Université de Toronto) travailleront sur ” Characterizing Dusty Debris in Exoplanetary Systems ” dirigé par Christine Chen (STScI). Chris Willott (NRC Herzberg) quant à lui travaillera avec Yue Shen (Carnegie) sur “A GNIRS Near-IR Spectroscopic Survey of z>5.7 Quasars “, et Craig Heinke (Université de l’Alberta) travaillera avec Robert Hynes (Louisiana State University) sur les « Dynamical Masses of Black Holes and Neutron Stars from the Galactic Bulge Survey” à l`aide de GMOS-S.

Les deux autres grands programmes acceptés pour 2015 sont dirigés par Ian Crossfield (U de l’Arizona) “Validating K2’s Habitable and Rocky Planets with AO Imaging” et Catherine Huitson (Université du Colorado) « The First Survey Dedicated to the Detection and Characterization of Clouds in Exoplanet Atmospheres “.

Premières Données Scientifiques de GRACES Maintenant Disponibles Publiquement

Quelques cibles scientifiques ont pu être observées avec GRACES lors de sa mise en service pour le semestre 2015B. Les cibles avaient été choisies par le STAC et comprennent un QSO, des noyaux de galaxies proches, une nébuleuse planétaire, certaines étoiles riches en alpha-éléments, et une étoile similaire au Soleil, ainsi que des étoiles standardes de spectrophotométrie. Les données à la fois brutes et réduites (via le pipeline Opera) sont disponibles publiquement ici. Les données sont superbes et le throughput de GRACES est encore mieux que prévu. La figure 1 montre une comparaison avec les performances des autres spectrographes à haute résolution sur des télescopes de 8-10 mètres, et GRACES les surpasse largement dans le rouge à partir d’environ 600 nm. GRACES a été développé au CNRC Herzberg en collaboration avec FiberTech Optica (de Kitchener, ON), et avec l’aide du personnel Gemini et TCFH. Encore une grande réussite pour la technologie innovatrice canadienne!

Figure 1 - Signal-sur-bruit mesuré après 1 heure d`observation de l'étoile Feige 66 avec GRACES (en mode 2-fibres, en noir), par rapport à HIRES / Keck (en vert) et UVES / VLT (en bleu). Dans le rouge à partir d`environ 600 nm GRACES  les surpasse largement.

Figure 1 – Signal-sur-bruit mesuré après 1 heure d`observation de l’étoile Feige 66 avec GRACES (en mode 2-fibres, en noir), par rapport à HIRES / Keck (en vert) et UVES / VLT (en bleu). Dans le rouge à partir d`environ 600 nm GRACES les surpasse largement.

Demandes `Fast Turnaround`: date limite toujours à la fin du mois

Ceci est un rappel que le programme `Fast Turnaround` se poursuit à Gemini-Nord tout au long de l’année, et que la date limite pour les demandes est à la fin de chaque mois. Les programmes acceptés seront actifs un mois plus tard et pour un total de 3 mois. Déjà de nombreux programmes canadiens ont été acceptés et observés. La prochaine date limite est le 30 Septembre (même s`il y a aussi un appel de demandes régulier). Notez que GRACES est offert pour cet appel Fast Turnaround de Septembre, ainsi que tous les autres instruments Gemini du Nord.

Les utilisateurs ont peut-être l’impression que le programme FT doit être utilisé exclusivement pour les observations qui doivent être effectuées rapidement. Cela n`est pas du tout le cas. Les demandes FT peuvent viser des événements astronomiques inhabituels ou inattendus, mais peuvent aussi être pour des études pilotes ou des projets autonomes courts, ou des observations courtes spéculatives et risquées, ou pour la finition d’une thèse où seules quelques observations supplémentaires courtes sont nécessaires, ou pour l`achèvement d’un ensemble de données existant pour en permettre la publication, ou pour tout autre type de projet court.

Aux dernières nouvelles le Conseil de direction vient d’approuver que le programme FT soit ouvert à Gemini-Sud aussi. Le premier appel de demandes qui comprendra Gemini-Sud sera probablement pour la fin d`Octobre. Le plan est que les demandes pour les deux télescopes iront dans un seul pool et le temps sera alloué selon le mérite plutôt que selon une application d’une stricte division 50:50 pour le Nord et le Sud.

S’il vous plaît veuillez vous inscrire à la liste de courriels pour le programme FT en envoyant un message à gemini-FT-reminders+subscribe@gemini.edu (de même, vous pouvez vous désinscrire en utilisant gemini-FT-reminders+unsubscribe@gemini.edu). Cette liste sera utilisée pour envoyer des rappels des dates limites mensuelles et des nouvelles sur des changements au programme qui pourraient intéresser les utilisateurs.

Beaucoup de Bonnes Choses dans le Forum de Réductions de Données Gemini

Ce forum est un lieu d’échanges d’idées, de scripts et des meilleures pratiques, et pour prendre part à des discussions avec d’autres utilisateurs sur les processus et stratégies de réduction de données. Si vous avez une question générale sur les stratégies pour la réduction de certains types de données, visitez le Forum pour trouver de l’aide. Et si vous avez écrit un script, une procédure ou avez des conseils pour les autres utilisateurs alors vous êtes les bienvenus pour les partager sur le Forum. Depuis sa création l’an dernier, il s`est maintenant peuplé de beaucoup d’informations intéressantes, par exemple vous pouvez trouver un cookbook de réductions pour GMOS-IFU et des scripts de réduction, des scripts de réduction pour GMOS en longue-fente qui comprend un tutoriel pour le mode Nod&Shuffle, un nouveau pipeline Python pour la réduction de données NIFS, ainsi que des scripts de réduction pour GNIRS et Flamingos2.
Visitez-le à: DR Forum.

Notez également qu’il y a un nouveau court tutoriel sur «Installation Ureka et PyRAF 101″ écrit par Kathleen Labrie ici.

Communiqués de Presse Canadiens Récents

  • La découverte d’une jeune exoplanète semblable à Jupiter nommé 51 Eri b a été annoncé par l’équipe de la campagne GPI. Ceci est la première exoplanète découverte dans le cadre du Sondage d`Exoplanètes GPI (GPIES), une étude de plus de 600 étoiles proches qui s`effectuera au cours des trois prochaines années. Cette nouvelle planète a environ deux fois la masse de Jupiter et tourne autour d’une jeune étoile de seulement 20 millions d’années. En plus d’être probablement la planète de plus faible masse jamais imagée, elle est également la première pour laquelle de grandes quantités de méthane ont été détectées directement dans son atmosphère. Cela la rend très semblable aux planètes géantes gazeuses de notre système solaire, qui ont des atmosphères lourdement dominées par le méthane. Ainsi 51 Eridani b nous donne un aperçu de ce que Jupiter avait l`air quand notre système solaire était jeune. GPIES est dirigé par B.MacIntosh (Standford) et comprend de nombreux Canadiens: C.Marois, B.Matthews, L.Saddlemeyer (Herzberg), Z.Draper, B.Gerard, M.Johnson-Groh (U de Victoria), J.Rameau, E.Artigau, R.Doyon, D.Lafreniere (U de Montréal), S.Bruzzone, S.Metchev (U of Western Ontario), J.Chilcote, J.Maire (Dunlap Institut), et M. Millar-Blanchaer (U de Toronto). Vous pouvez consulter le communiqué de presse au complet ici.
    Figure 2 - Image de GPI de 51 Eri b. L'étoile centrale lumineuse a été principalement éliminé par le coronagraphe ainsi que d`autres masques dans les logiciels pour permettre la détection de l'exoplanète un million de fois plus faible. Crédits: J. Rameau (UdeM) et C. Marois (CNRC Herzberg).

    Figure 2 – Image de GPI de 51 Eri b. L’étoile centrale lumineuse a été principalement éliminé par le coronagraphe ainsi que d`autres masques dans les logiciels pour permettre la détection de l’exoplanète un million de fois plus faible. Crédits: J. Rameau (UdeM) et C. Marois (CNRC Herzberg).

  • Un communiqué de presse conjoint de l’Université de Toronto et Gemini a été lançé le 16 Septembre 2015, présentant une mise à jour plus précise de l`orbite de l`exoplanète bêta Pic b basée sur de nouvelles mesures astrométriques prises dans le mode spectroscopique de GPI sur une échelle de temps de 14 mois. La série d’images captées entre Novembre 2013 et Avril 2015 montre l’exoplanète β Pic b se déplaçant sur 1 an et demi de sa période orbitale de 22 ans. Non seulement ce sont les mesures les plus précises jamais obtenues de la position de la planète, mais les données permettent également d’étudier les interactions dynamiques de l’exoplanète β Pic b et le disque de débris entourant l`étoile. Les nouvelles mesures de l`orbite permettent également de mieux contraindre la masse stellaire de Beta Pic, à 1,60 \ pm0.05 masses solaires. L’étude a été dirigée par M.Millar-Blanchaer (U de Toronto), avec l’aide de D-S.Moon (U de Toronto), J.Chilcote, J.Maire (Institut Dunlap), Z.Draper (U de Victoria), J.Dunn, C.Marois, L.Saddlemeyer (CNRC Herzberg). Pour voir le communiqué de presse et l’animation complète, cliquez ici.
Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.